Tag Archives: Christmas

A Christmas treat for the Welsh troops at Bedford

In the second week of January 1916  thousands of soldiers of the 68th (2nd Welsh) Division were given a Christmas treat by the town of Bedford where the Division was stationed.

Over four nights,  Tuesday, 11 January to Friday, 14 January, some 2,000 men were entertained each night in the Bedford Castle Rink and some 600 men each night in the Corn Exchange, with other troops from the Division being entertained in Kempston on the Thursday and Friday nights, and in St Neots on the Wednesday night.

The treat was organised by the Bedford Borough Recreation Committee which, Bedford being only a small community, had appealed to the troops’ home communities in Wales and elsewhere for funds to help provide the treat.  All the labour was voluntary with between 300 and 400 townspeople helping out with what was a substantial undertaking for the town. Each entertainment began at 6.45 pm and finished at 9.30 pm, and on the Tuesday evening at the Castle Rink the ‘ladies were still making sandwiches at 6.30 pm.’

Refreshments and entertainment were provided each night, including ‘a first-class variety concert with artistes engaged from London, and a fresh programme each evening’.

Mr Herbert Trustram Eve in proposing a toast to the Division in the Corn Exchange on the Tuesday evening said that this was the third division that had been in Bedford. Bedford wanted them to stop as long as they ought to, but when they went they wanted another division and another division. They never wanted to be without troops in Bedford during the war, because they liked to entertain them and make them as happy as they could.

There is a full report of the treat, including descriptions of the entertainment, the rousing speeches, the appeal for funds, and the units present at each venue.

 

 

Christmas doings at Bedford

This is the first Christmas for the ‘When the Welsh came to Bedford’ website. We wish all our followers and visitors a happy Christmas and a happy, healthy and peaceful New Year. Thank you for your support this year and we look forward to bringing you more in 2016 about the Great War Welsh troops and their time in Bedford and on active service after they left the town.

What was Christmas like for some of those troops 100 years ago?

The Hereford Times reported after Christmas 1915 on how the 2nd Herefords had spent the Christmas period itself, with the sub-heading ‘Christmas Doings at Bedford’. ‘Christmas for the 2nd Herefords was’ it said ‘necessarily rather quiet. People living in the comparative security of the west fail to realise how dismal the streets of eastern towns are under the Lighting Orders.

‘It has been whispered in the Battalion that many people about Hereford are under the impression that all the “2nds” are in nice comfortable billets. If that idea is existing in the mind of Herefordians it is quite wrong; the greater part of the Battalion are in empty houses, which are not very conducive to great comfort. Only a small number of men were able to get leave for Christmas.

‘For several days before Christmas the Battalion postman was kept very hard at work, and his mails were so heavy that he had to have extra assistance to deal with the Christmas rush of letters, and especially parcels. One of them was heard to remark that he thought the Herefords had the heaviest mail in the Brigade. The serving out of the mails was a very animated scene, and many were the lucky ones carrying off parcels of every size to their billets.

‘On Christmas Eve (a Friday) evergreens were given to the mess orderlies in some companies, to decorate the mess rooms with, and on Christmas morning (Saturday) they had quite a festive appearance.

‘On Christmas morning the climatic conditions were not of the best. At 8.45 am, the Battalion fell in for church parade. Afterwards they were dismissed for the day: but had to remain under cover a good deal on account of the weather.

‘Dinner was at one o’clock, when the Battalion sat down to a good, substantial meal of roast beef, potatoes and peas, and “Territorial pudding”. Beer and cigarettes were issued after dinner. The mess rooms at this meal were inspected by the Colonel, who was anxious that every man had sufficient. Each man in the Battalion had a bag issued to him to keep his small kit in. The bags were kindly given by Mrs Wood Roe.

‘In the evening there was an entertainment at the Corn Exchange. There were numerous competitions, such as hat trimming, egg and spoon racing, etc, and one was very pleased to notice that the Herefords were not  unsuccessful. Hat trimming appeared to be their strong point, for they carried off several prizes, namely, the first, third and fourth. They also carried off several other prizes. After the competitions and pictures had finished, a little dancing brought a very pleasant and successful evening to a close. There was also an Anglo-Scotch concert party at the theatre; this party was undoubtedly one of the best heard in this town.

‘Over Christmas, tattoo was sounded at 9.30 instead of 9 o’clock. On Sunday the Battalion had church parade. Monday was not observed as a holiday.’

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